Field Recording Competition 1 – winners!

Field Recording

Sorry its taken me this long to post the winners of the first Field Recording Competition, as you know I’ve been a little busy but am starting to get caught up…. Congrats to the winners below – lots and lots of great entries, but these were the stand out sounds to my ears!

I have a prop in mind for the next competition, will post it in the next few days since while the deadline wont be until end of January people might have time to experiment during holdiay downtime….

 

 

 

Field Recording

CAN KAZAZ

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

CK: I took one of my cardboard boxes and took a look around in my room to decide how to resonate it. Because i didn’t want to make crunchy, crispy, dry or percussive sounds which you can easily produce from cardboard material. So I decided to go with simple idea of bowing the box. First I bowed the box with a chopstick and it didn’t create the sound i would prefer. Then I found my 50cm ruler. It felt like it would work. But simply bowing the edge of the box wasn’t enough because it needed a kind of rosin to resonate. That’s why I wet the ruler with water. When I was bowing the box, the wet ruler made the box’s edge wet. Now it was resonating.

TP: How many takes did you do to find it?

CK: I bowed the box around 50-60 times in 45 minutes of recording. It might sound like the recording is distorting but it’s the sizzling sound of the ruler bowing the edge of the box.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

CK: I used my Sony PCM-D50 recorder with XY microphone position to record.

 

 

 

Field Recording

CESAR TIMON

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

CT: I made a list of 4/5 possibilities and that was the first one… I knew it was going to be the one. I saw the bass string in front of me and the rest was a creative evolution from that. I thought I could get a rich, complex and really interesting sound.

TP: How many takes did you do to find it?

CT: I needed 3 takes.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

CT: Beyerdynamic MC930 > SD Usbpre2 (via spdif) > Tascam DR100 mk2 (24/96 mono)

 

 

 

Field Recording

DAVID GE

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

DG: I just thinking about how to make music with these sound of box keep falling down from upstairs

 

 

 

Field Recording

HIDEFUMI AOKI

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

HA: I found this interesting helicopter’s flying like element when I was playing with my cat.

TP: How many takes did you do to find it?

HA: A few takes in different rooms such as bath room, room with wooden floor and Japanese Tatami room.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

HA: Tascam DR-40

 

 

 

Field Recording

IAIN GRANT

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

IG: The recording took place in a tiny corridor in a basement few doors away from my recording booth. To record the sound I placed U87 inside the box (running through focusrite8 red pre) and used cello bow to create the sound. I recorded several takes and chose the one I liked the most. All of them sounded interesting and good enough to my ear so the choice wasn’t difficult.

 

 

 

Field Recording

IAIN HETHERINGTON

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

IH: I tend to approach all my work with the same process: I start with something simple and build in complexity until I don’t know what I’m doing anymore then go through the realisation that the simple solution was the best. I made instruments with elastic bands, I froze boxes, I combined them with other materials, I tried using the acoustics of the box in an Alvin Lucier type way. The more complex it became, the further from the sonic character of the box I got. The first thing I had tried was simply dragging my fingers along the surface of the card. Listening back to my recordings I realised these recordings conveyed the most of the sonic character: the corrugations, the dryness, the resonance. From there I realised I could bring out more of these features by using a harder tool. This turned out to be a piece of wood. Although this added it’s own sonic character, it was better than using metal or plastics.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

IH: I used a Sound Devices 702 with a pair of Line Audio CM3′s in a coincident setup. I had tried contact mics, but the airborne sound was closer to what my ears were hearing.

 

 

 

Field Recording

KOSTAS LOUKOVIKAS

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

KL: This sound was one of the last ideas that popped up. I placed two condenser cardioid microphones, one outside the box, recording overall and the second facing the surface from the inside, trying to catch the resonance of the space. I started to draw abstract lines with a pen, later on found some patterns by writing down numbers, when I realized after several takes that actually I began to hear an animal roaring, a wild angry tiger somehow. So this was it for me. A sound that its origin is recognizable, yet at the same time it simulates a completely different one. I chose to work with a corrugated cardboard box so, basically, I controlled the tension, the hanger of the animal by pressing the pen differently each time on the surface of the box.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

KL: I recorded with two Octava MK 012 condenser, cardioid mics, passed through Edirol M16DX sound card to end up in Logic pro 9 of a MacBook Pro.

 

 

 

Field Recording

OZAN KURTULUS

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

OK: We wanted to do something differently. So we tried something else except cutting or screeching boxes. We tried box, water, and contact mic combination and we loved it

TP: How many takes did you do to find it?

OK: It didn’t too much. About an hour.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

OK: We use a Nagra SD hand recorder. And use some cheap contact mics :) a cardboard box and a bottle of water.

 

 

 

Field Recording

ROBERT GARVIN

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

RG: I really just started playing around with the box, dragging it around on pavement, on dead leaves, then concrete, and then tried a few other things, but nothing really struck me as unique. I then switched gears, and attached a home made piezo contact element to the inside of the box with a rubber band, then took various objects (including a beetle!) and scraped/hit/brushed/ the area around the microphone, but nothing was really exciting. I even threaded some kite string through the box and used a power drill to winch it through really fast, but that didn’t sound impressive either. Finally, towards the end of my session, I grabbed a small plastic rake and started to scrape the box with it, and ran across a neat sound, I switched to the metal rake in the picture, and tried a few more times, and pulled this sound out.

TP: What gear did you record it with? recorder? mic/s?

RG: Piezo Contact element (simple radio shack type), Mbox 2 (from late 2000s), and Macbook Pro (Audacity).

 

 

 

Field Recording

VLADIMIR MATVEEV

TP: How did you discover this particular sound?

VM: First I took a long thin box. At one side I placed my Zoom hn4 inside the box. At the opposite side of the box I placed my kitchen oven grill. Then I tied an ordinary rope to the grill. After that I winded round that rope to the another small box. The sound goes after I pull the rope with small box up. I suppose the rope transmit the sound vibrations to the grill and the big box is vibrating and also acts as a resonator.

 

 

6 Responses to Field Recording Competition 1 – winners!

  1. Damn cool Sounds, guys. Good work. So sad, that i didn´t found the time to contribute to this nice contes.

  2. Can Kazaz says:

    Great sounds from everybody! Loved it.

  3. Thomas says:

    Any news about the next competition?

  4. Pingback: Конкурс по саунд дизайну – картонная коробка | Matveev Sound Design

  5. Pingback: Sound design competition – cardboard box | Matveev Sound Design

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