Japan Field Trip 4 Ryokan

The night we stayed in Onomichi we stayed in a very beautiful traditional Ryokan – if you need a good reccomendation it was Nishiyama-B

So I took the opportunity to record all of the doors, as we needed them for the film…

Japan field recording

The front entrance door

Japan field recording

Interior Shoji doors:

Japan field recording

Japan field recording

Interior Fusuma doors:

Japan field recording

The windows were interesting – the glass was held in without any putty and rattled very nicely so along with opens and closes I also did a few careful recordings of rattles & shakes…

Japan field recording

Japan field recording

I also recorded some footsteps & movement on the beautiful Tatami floors – not to actually use but as a reference for our foley team

Japan field recording

I also recorded some footsteps and movement on the wood floors too, which had some beautiful creaks

Japan field recording

Meals were included in our stay at Nishiyama and they were fantastic – this was breakfast! Oishi!!

Japan field recording

With regards to foley, it is historically interesting that footsteps/foley were often used as a warning device in Japan. For example all of the grounds surrounding the Imperial Palace in Tokyo are covered in a fine crunchy gravel – it is impossible to take a single step without making quite a lot of sound and this is a deliberate feature of the Palace, so that back in the day no one could sneak in without being detected by guards. I also read of a temple that had famously creaky floorboards – known as a Nightingale floor or uguisubari for the very same reason: “Dry boards naturally creak under pressure, but these floors were designed so that the flooring nails rubbed against a jacket or clamp, causing chirping noises” – there is a lot more info along with examples here

Suspect I’ll have to visit one of these next time I visit Kyoto:

Daikaku-ji temple in Kyoto.
Ninomura Palace in Nijo Castle in Kyoto.
Chio-in temple in Kyoto.
Toji-in temple in Kyoto.

2 Responses to Japan Field Trip 4 Ryokan

  1. Regarding the gravel at the Imperial Palace… [it is impossible to take a single step without making quite a lot of sound].

    Hence the invention of the NINJA!

  2. Tristan says:

    Really interesting, I’ve stayed in a Ryokan in Kyoto… That last picture looks like a traditional breakfast served in a one!! ;-)

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