My newest old camera

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Thanks to eBay I have my first 35mm film camera on its way to me, and not coincidentally it shares the same m42 lens format that I have become obsessed with for my Canon 5DmkIII. If you are interested in analogue photography it is incredible what a small amount of $$ can get you – it feels a bit like buying a mint Nagra 4.2 for $200 or something…

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What a beautiful object! A manual for the Fujica ST801 is here (I plan to invest in a medium format camera sooner or later, but feel I need to get confident shooting film before making that investment)

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I also backed this Kickstarter project:
Help FILM Ferrania build the factory of the future and the first batch of film is your reward!

 

update: this is a nice philosophical rant: why shoot film

2 Responses to My newest old camera

  1. Guy says:

    About medium format and shooting film first… the best advice I can give is fairly logical … buy short rolls… you can get 8 and 16 exposure films and they are PERFECT for shooting bracketed series of stills with settings recorded in a notebook… you can then fire off that roll for processing without having to burn 36 exposures on a subject all in one hit… this keeps costs per test down… rather than just running 6 tests on a roll for example… you might not want to run 6 tests today… but you want to run 2 NOW !

    The second piece of advice on medium format… there is no getting used to film… IMHO. Thats because every camera has its own tiny idiosyncrasies which set it apart from the rest… or make it similar but different because of x and y. Take the disputed Hasselblad X-Pan http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/haselbla.shtml I have had mine for years and have shot quite a bit on it… I have varied films constantly until I found the film I loved the most and found the setup I trended towards. It’s not rocket science in terms of formula but its one I never told anyone – and thats how I shoot with it. As its a rangefinder it has a focal point that is mind bogglingly good. The frame is slightly offset which takes a bit of getting used to and is something that is not possible with any other film camera you might think you can practice with. It brackets remarkably well and its nice and rugged. Something you need when shooting like I do with panoramic… I like to get high up, or right out on an edge… or very low down… usually with tripod… or a tshirt to take the shutter recoil away.

    • tim says:

      Thanks Guy – thats great advice on both counts! I was thinking about that with regards to shooting B&W vs colour film. I definitely want to be shooting B&W but at times would want to switch to colour. Easy with MF cameras with hot swappable backs eg Hasselblad 500 but using shorter rolls of 35 is perfect solution!

      One aspect of my photography I want to get more confident with is being able to predict/manage exposure more – this is especially true with long exposures! I have a good light meter so I need to start using it & learn to do the offsets for using my Lee Big Stopper.

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